• slide10
  • slide13
  • slide21
  • slide41
  • slide92
  • slide93

Latest Vision News

Block the Blue Light

The truth is, blue light isn’t all bad. It shouldn’t be blocked at all times. It can help memory, boost alertness, and elevate your mood! Still, the eye cannot take blue light all day long and it can easily contribute to eye strain especially when it is coming from computer screens and tablets and cellphones.

These days, we’re working, learning, and relaxing in front of screens emitting blue light all throughout the day—and night. Even your average indoor lightbulb can give off blue light.

You’re probably wondering. Okay, but what is blue light anyway?

Blue light is the highest energy visible light on the UV spectrum, and before the advent of technology, the sun was our only significant source of blue light. Problems arise, however, with the amount of blue light to which we are exposing our brains and bodies, potentially causing undue stress to our eyes and even making it hard to sleep at night.

There are a few ways to avoid this strain. First, let us introduce you to one of the best options on the list: blue light blocking lenses.

What are blue light blocking lenses?

Good question. Glasses equipped with lenses with blue light protection are a simple solution to combat the symptoms caused by increased screen time. The technology in these lenses has a subtle tint that softens harsh blue light rays as they pass through, reducing the amount of blue light to which the wearer’s eyes are exposed. They aren’t heavy or thick and can be made without a prescription attached to them. They can be made to fit adults, teens and children and are safe for all to wear. All blue light blocking glasses aren’t made the same. They can be made to block a certain percentage of blue light. How much you decide to block, well, that is up to you. Give our practice a call and we will gladly talk you through your options!

What else can I do to block blue light?

While you won’t be able to block it without the correct lens as your shield, you can still manage it.

When working at a computer, for example, you’re often looking up and down, from screen to paper, and your eyes are moving around and refocusing time after time. This is where the 20-20-20 rule can come into play. For every 20 minutes you’re in front of a screen, turn your head and look at something at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Just, give your eyes a break.

Another option: simply lower the brightness. The display settings for your screen on your phone or computer allow you to adjust the amount of light seeping from the screen. If your screen looks like a light source, lower the brightness. If your screen looks dull and a bit too dark, it’s okay and probably for the best to brighten it up. A dull screen can also strain your eyes.

Bottom line, protect your eyes the best way you can and remember that we are here to help! Looking to get a pair of blue light protection glasses that fit your lifestyle and your budget? Here at Infinity Eye Care, we can customize any style of frame and lens prescription with blue light-blocking technology.

Providing the New River Valley
with Quality, Comprehensive Eye Care...

Begin Booking an Appointment

Our society is on the go...and to match a fast paced life style, technology has to keep up. Thus, the impetus for a unique, wearable piece of technology that customizes your every need was developed: Google glasses. The idea of wearing a computer on your head is not new...Steve Mann invented a form of Digital Eye Glass in the 1980s. The original intent of this invention was to act as a camera to record, and as a computer monitor .

Google Glass, as it is referred to, takes that intent a step beyond by adding features of computer design integrated music, fitness, cycling, texting, golfing, navigation and more. It has been released in a limited “Explore” version selling for $1500.00 US Dollars. They intend to release a public version to the market as well.

This invention has been used in the medical field to help medical doctors assist in remote instructional surgeries and teaching techniques. In ophthalmic medicine, it has an expansive role in educating doctors and students about the retina by allowing a view through an Indirect Ophthalmoscope at retinal tissue. The technology is also being used to integrate medical health records in clinics and hospitals.

The upside to this wearable technology is its applications in the fields of technology, medicine, communication, filming, sports and recreation. Furthermore, the basic design has been embellished by fashion designer eyewear to give the glass a more enhanced look.

The downside is the privacy concerns, and health and vision concerns. Privacy can be violated by recording without consent, and incorporating facial recognition features. Safety issues emerge when the device is worn during driving........drivers in several states have been fined. There are also vision concerns. The Google Glass optometrist from Harvard has warned about eyestrain if the glasses are used improperly or for too long. The side effects of eyestrain and headaches have not been widely experienced.

From a vision standpoint, the ergonomics could be improved or altered. The current configuration, if used too long,causes the eye to focus in a way the eye was not designed to. With the display in the upper temporal quadrant, Google’s design was for quick, periodic viewing. Eyestrain and headache can occur with extended viewing. The unwanted side effect evolves from the eye diverging or turning out while reading. The eye’s original design was to turn in or converge when reading, for this is the normal comfortable posture for the eye. The eye does not want to look up and out for extended reading periods, and those muscles simply were not designed for that activity.

Albert Einstein once said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” So once Google Glass, or other wearable technology, advances and simplifies the ergonomics issues, going one more step into the future of wearable technology, then the sky is virtually the limit and creativity and imagination will guide the next advancement.

For more detailed information on Google Glass, visit google.com.

 

The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

envelope
© Infinity Eye Care | 7350 Peppers Ferry Blvd. | Radford, VA 24141 | (540) 731-1010 | Email Us | Site Map
Text and photos provided are the property of EyeMotion and cannot be duplicated or moved.